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Tutorial: Create a presentation That uses Different Groupings and Datasets

Let's create a more advanced presentation in Rhiza for Research to introduce you to powerful capabilities that allow you to compare target series with different datasets and groupings in the same section of a presentation.

In this presentation, we still want to see which dealers sold new BMWs in 2015 in the Atlanta DMA. However, we also want to know more information about the Atlanta market for BMWs. In particular, we'll use the Polk dataset to look at which models sell best, and then we'll use the Nielsen Scarborough USA+ dataset to look at the behavior of buyers in the market. We'll use three visualizations (a table and two charts) to examine the data, and then save the presentation as a Microsoft PowerPoint file that can be shared with others.

Before you begin

Before starting this tutorial, make sure you've met the following prerequisites:

  • You've registered your Rhiza for Research account. See Create your account.
  • You have access to the IHS Polk New Registrations and the Nielsen Scarborough USA+ dataset. If your company has not purchased these datasets, you will not be able to complete this tutorial. See Know what datasets you have access to.

Step 1: Log in and start your presentation

  1. Log in Rhiza for Research and navigate to the Reports tab.
  2. Click the Research report icon, and then click the Research Report link to open a new report.

    Click the Research icon first, then click the Research Report link

    Figure 89: Click the Research icon first, then click the Research Report link (click to enlarge)

    When the new report opens, it looks like this. Note the following key areas you'll be using in this tutorial.

    The key areas of a new presentation

    Figure 90: What you see when you open a new Research presentation; key areas are called out (click to enlarge)

  3. Rename your presentation:
    1. Click Untitled Presentation at the top of the report. The name changes to a text box.
    2. Type Atlanta BMW Sales, and click OK.
  4. Rename the untitled section by clicking Untitled Section, typing Atlanta BMW Sales: 2015, and then clicking OK.
  5. Save the presentation by clicking Save Presentation at the top right of the page. From this point forward, any work you do is automatically saved.

Step 2: Add data

  1. In the Target Series pane, click Create Target Series to open the Create Target Series wizard. This is where you will specify everything you need for your target series, including the dataset, the target, and the attributes you want to group by.

    The Create Target Series wizard when you first create a new target series

    Figure 91: The empty Target Series Creation wizard (click to enlarge)

  2. In the Series Title field, type Atlanta BMW Sales: 2015.

  3. In the Select a Dataset tab, start typing Polk New Registrations, then select it when it appears in the list. Click Next.

    Adding a title and a dataset to the target series

    Figure 92: Adding a title and a dataset to the target series (click to enlarge)

  4. In the Select a Target tab, define the set of information you’re interested in looking at.
    1. In the Date section, select Custom from the Predefined Date Range field.
    2. Use the Starting Date field to select January 2015 and the Ending Date field to select December 2015.
    3. In the Dataset-based tab, select the Make attribute, and then type BMW.
    4. In the Map-based tab, select the DMA attribute, and then type Atlanta.
    5. Click Next.

      Define your target by selecting attributes and adding values for them

      Figure 93: As you define the filters for your target, the Series Summary pane is updated (click to enlarge)

  5. In the Group By tab, specify how you want to group -- or categorize -- the results that are returned.

    In the Dataset-based tab, click Dealer Name. This means that you’ll be looking at all of the 2015 BMW sales in Atlanta, broken out by dealer name.

    Define a grouping

    Figure 94: Choose Dealer Name as the attribute to group by (click to enlarge)

  6. Click Save Series in the bottom of the Series Summary area. The series configuration wizard closes and you are returned to the main body of your presentation.
  7. Click Apply Changes. By default, Rhiza for Research generates a table visualization with the results of your query. As you can see, all of the dealers and their registrations are shown in the table; you can click any column header to sort the table that way.

    The table shows all Atlanta BMW dealers and their 2015 registrations

    Figure 95: The default table visualization shows all of the Atlanta BMW dealers and their 2015 registrations (click to enlarge)

  8. Click Table at the top of the visualization to make the title editable, and then type BMW Sales By Dealer.

 

Step 3: Add a second Target Series

Let's add a second target series to look at Atlanta BMW sales with a different grouping. Instead of seeing the number of registrations broken out by dealer, let's look at what models are selling best in this DMA. We can accomplish this quickly by using the Copy Series function and making a quick edit to the target series Group By tab.

  1. In the Target Series pane, click the gear icon next to our Atlanta BMW Sales: 2015 target series, and then click Copy Series. The Create Target Series wizard opens; it's pre-populated with the information from the original target series.

    Use the Copy Series function to quickly create a similar target series

    Figure 96: Select Copy Series from the gear icon to quickly create a similar target series (click to enlarge)

  2. In the Series Title field, type Atlanta BMW: Top 2015 Models.
  3. Since we don't want to change anything about the target, click right over to the Group By tab in the wizard.
  4. On the Group By tab, click Model, and then click Save Series. The Create Target Series wizard closes.
  5. From the Target Series pane, click Apply Changes. You'll notice that nothing happens in the visualization pane, although Rhiza for Research did create the target series and return the results. We need to explicitly add a visualization now, so let's move on to the next section.

 

Step 4: Add and configure a visualization

We have a basic table that shows the data for the first target series (Atlanta BMW Sales: 2015) we defined; in this section, we're going to add a bar chart that shows the results of the second target series (Atlanta BMW: Top 2015 Models). In addition, we're going to configure the chart to show only a subset of the data; instead of showing all 29 of the models sold in Atlanta, we want to see just the top 10.

  1. Click Add Viz > Bar Chart at the top of the report to add a new visualization. (Hint: If you don't see the Add Viz button, hover over the area to make it appear.)

    Add a bar chart viz

    Figure 97: The Add Viz menu allows you to add a bar chart (click to enlarge)

    After the chart loads, you’ll notice that it defaults to the original target series. We'll need to do some configuration.

  2. From the chart's gear icon, click Configure.

    Access the configuration dialog box from the gear ico

    Figure 98: Use the gear icon to access the configuration options for your visualization (click to enlarge)

  3. In the configuration dialog box, click Series, and then click Show on Chart next to the Atlanta BMW: Top 2015 Models target series.

    Change the target series that you want to show on the chart

    Figure 99: Change the configuration on the Series tab to show the correct target series on the chart (click to enlarge)

  4. Click OK to apply the changes. You'll notice that the bar chart doesn't have a descriptive name, it shows 25 results by default (many of which represent only a low number of registrations), and that the Y-axis isn't named what we want. We need to do a little more configuration to make this chart tell the story we want.

    The bar chart shows the wrong Y-axis label and contains several statisically insignificant data points

    Figure 100: Our initial bar chart needs some configuration, including a title, a correct Y-axis label, and a shortened list of results (click to enlarge)

  5. Let's make this chart a little more useful and visually pleasing by giving it a name, updating the Y-axis label, removing the statistically insignificant models, and adding numeric labels to help us see the actual number of registrations each model has.
    1. Click Bar Chart to open the editing box, and then type Top 10 BMW Models: Atlanta 2015.
    2. From the chart’s gear icon (in the top right corner), click Configure.
    3. In the configuration dialog box, click Y Axis and make the following changes:
      • In the Axis Title field, type Model Name.
      • Ensure the results are sorted in descending order (that is, those models with the most sales are shown at the top of the chart).
      • Use the Items to Show field to specify that you want to see only the top 10 models.
    4. While still in the configuration dialog box, click Series, and then click Labels > Show Labels.

      Configuration options for Y-axis of the bar chart

      Figure 101: The Y-axis bar chart configuration options (click to enlarge)

    5. Click OK. Now our bar chart looks much cleaner. We’ve lost some models, but since we're trying to show the top-selling models, that's okay.

 

Step 5: Add a target series to examine buyers' behavior

Now that we know how many BMWs were sold in 2015 and what the top 10 models were, let's learn a bit about the buying habits of those people who plan to purchase a BMW in the Atlanta market. This information might be helpful in building a solid marketing strategy for a dealership. Because the Polk dataset does not contain behavioral information, we need to turn to the Nielsen Scarborough USA+ dataset to create this target series.

  1. In the Target Series pane, click the gear icon next to our Atlanta BMW Sales: 2015 target series, and then click Copy Series. The Create Target Series wizard opens; it's pre-populated with the information from the original target series.

    Use the Copy Series function to quickly create a similar target series

    Figure 102: Select Copy Series from the gear icon to quickly create a similar target series (click to enlarge)

  2. In the Series Title field, type Atlanta BMW: Buyer Behavior.
  3. In the Select a Dataset tab, type Scarborough USA+ and then select it. Notice that the pre-populated values for the target and grouping are no longer there; that's because we've selected a different dataset.

    Select the Scarborough USA+ dataset

    Figure 103: Specify the Scarborough USA+ dataset (click to enlarge)

  4. In the Select a Target tab, define your target audience filters. In this case, we are looking at people in the Atlanta DMA who own or lease a BMW.
    1. In the Map-Based sub-tab, click the DMA attribute and type Atlanta.

      Use the Map-Based tab to add a value for the DMA attribute

      Figure 104: Use the Map-Based tab to add a value for the DMA attribute (click to enlarge)

    2. In the Survey-Based sub-tab, start typing Make of any vehicle owned or leased (HHLD) in the search box; the list of attributes will narrow down until only this one is available. (Hint: If the search has trouble finding this question, you can look for it under the Automotive category.)

      Start typing in the search bar for the attribute you want to find

      Figure 105: Use the search bar to find survey questions or answers that are relevant to what you're interested in (click to enlarge)

    3. Click BMW: Any Vehicle from the list of answers.
  5. In the Group By tab, define how you want to group the results for this target set. Here, we are going to group them by a particular question in the dataset that asks them why they used the dealer they did when they bought their BMW.
    1. In the Survey-Based sub-tab, start typing Primary reasons usd dealer to buy/leas last used vhcl (HHLD) in the search box; the list of attributes will narrow down until only this one is available. (Hint: If the search has trouble finding this question, you can look for it under the Automotive category.) Note that there are two attributes with the same name but a different number of answers; pick the one with 10 answers (shown in the graphic below).

      Group the target series results by a specific survey question and its answers

      Figure 106: Use the search feature to find survey questions and answers you want to group by; you can include some or all of the answers (click to enlarge)

    2. Select all of the answers except for Did not buy from dealer.
  6. Click Save Series to close the Create Target Series wizard.
  7. Click Apply Changes in the Target Series pane.
  8. Now we need to add and configure a visualization to show the data we just returned about our BMW buyers:
    1. Click Add Viz > Column Chart at the top of the report to add a new visualization. As before, the chart defaults to showing the first target series we defined, so we need to configure it.
    2. Click Column Chart at the top of the viz to open the editing box and type the title Reasons for using dealer.
    3. From the chart's gear icon, click Configure to open the configuration dialog box and make the following changes:
      • On the Series tab, click Show on Chart next to the Atlanta BMW: Buyer Behavior target series, and then click Show Labels.
      • On the X Axis tab, set Label Rotation to 45°.
      • On the Y Axis tab, set the Data to Display to Total Weighted Individuals. (When dealing with a survey-style dataset that has weighted values, we recommend using the total weighted individual count rather than the actual respondent count. For more information about what these terms mean, see Nielsen Scarborough FAQs.)
    4. Click OK to close the configuration box. Our chart looks much cleaner now.

      The column chart after we configured it by adding a title and labels, changing the data to display, and rotating the labels on the X axis

      Figure 107: The column chart after we configured it by adding a title and labels, changing the data to display, and rotating the labels on the X axis (click to enlarge)

Step 6: Format your Section

Right now, our three visualizations are stacked one on top of the other. To make it easier to digest the data, we need to format our section to use a two-column layout. Although it's not critical for our tutorial, there are times when it's crucial to be able to examine the data in two visualizations side-by-side, or two ensure that two particular visualizations appear on the same PowerPoint slide. Using a two-column layout and taking advantage of the drag-and-drop placement of visualizations allows you to have this kind of control.

  1. To give ourselves more working space, use the hamburger icons to close the Section pane and Target Series pane.
  2. From the top menu bar, click the layout icon, and then choose the two-column option.

    Use the layout icon to choose a two-colum layout for the visualizations

    Figure 108: Use the layout icon to choose a two-colum layout for the visualizations (click to enlarge)

  3. Drag and drop your visualizations until you have a layout you like.

Our finished presentation might look something like this. Note that there is an extra visualization (a table) that we didn't add in this tutorial that simply shows the weighted individual and the proportion for our Scarborough USA+ target series; it complements the column chart we created.

A two-column format for a presentation

Figure 109: A two-column format for a presentation, with visualizations that have been rearranged (click to enlarge)

Step 7: Generate a PowerPoint to Share

Create a PowerPoint version of your presentation by clicking Actions > Generate PowerPoint at the top of the screen.

When your presentation has finished generating, you can download it by clicking Download PowerPoint or share it by clicking Actions > Share Presentation.

 

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